PEPSI – Growth

Your largest fear carries your greatest growth.

PEPSI Growth & Teamwork (PDF)


1.
A: What do you think about being acquired by Google?
B: At first blush, I didn’t understand why we were bought out. I was on the fence about it and it was a bitter pill to swallow. I thought we got the short end of the stick.
A: I understand how you feel. I felt like we jumped from the frying pan into the fire. It really got under my skin.
B: However, now that we are on the same boat. I think Google runs a very tight ship. It’s a breath of fresh air and I think we’ve gotten a second wind.
A: You’re preaching to the choir!

Answer

At first blush (i): at first glimpse, upon first impression or consideration.
To buy someone out (pv): to purchase the ownership of a company.
To be on the fence about something (i): to be undecided about something.
A bitter pill to swallow (i): a unpleasant or painful situation to accept.
To get the short end of the stick (i): to suffer the bad effects of a situation, to get a bad deal.
To jump from the frying pan into the fire (i): to go from a bad situation to an even worse situation.
To get under someone’s skin (i): To bother, annoy or irritate someone intentionally, often used in sports.
To be on the same boat (i): to be in the same situation, more often used for unpleasant situations.
To run a tight ship (i): to run an organization in an orderly, disciplined and efficient manner.
A breath of fresh air (i): something or someone new and different, which makes it seem more exciting.
To get a second wind (i): to get a second burst of energy, to have increased energy after feeling tired or weak.
To preach to the choir (i): to make your case to a group of people who already agree with you.

2.
A: I will not sign off on this merger! It doesn’t sit right with me.
B: Look at the big picture. It’s a win-win situation. Joining forces will be mutually beneficial.
A: We have different visions for the future. We have completely different company cultures. We don’t build any kind of synergy. We’re not a good fit.
B: Our company is having a down year. We’ve tried cutting back on our expenses. We have to cut our losses and move on. At the end of the day, this is our only solution.
A: I understand that recently we’ve been in hot water, that we’ve been in a rut, that we’ve come under fire from shareholders. I understand all that. However, I’m sticking to my guns. With all due respect, this is idea does not hold water. The writing is on the wall.
B: Don’t make me pull rank.

Answer

To sign off on something (pv): to approve something formally by a signature.
To sit right with someone (i): to be acceptable, or understandable.
The big picture (i): a complete understanding or view of something, the entire perspective of a situation.
A win-win situation (i): mutual benefit between two or more parties.
A down year (i): an unsuccessful year.
To cut back on something (pv): to reduce the amount of something (expenses, spending, or food).
To cut one’s losses (i): to stop doing something that is already failing. To stop fighting a losing battle.
To move on (pv): to continue moving forwards.
At the end of the day (e): finally, ultimately, basically, essentially, in the end.
To be in hot water (i): in a lot of trouble.
To be in a rut (i): to be in a situation where no progress has been made, to have a lifestyle that doesn’t change.
To come under fire (i): to be criticized.
To stick to one’s guns (i): to stand up to one’s rights, convictions; to maintain one’s opinion or point of view.
With all due respect (e): to politely criticize or disagree with someone.
Something does not hold water (i): a statement does not appear to be correct or reasonable.
The writing is on the wall (i): there are clear signs that something unpleasant is going to happen.
To pull rank (i): to use the power that your position gives you to order someone around.

3.
A: Richard, I want you to take charge of the next project. Rallying the troops is your bread and butter.
B: Thank you so much for this opportunity.
A: But I do have one condition…I want to talk about the elephant in the room. I know you have a beef with Charles but he will be joining your team. He has the complementary skills to make this project successful.
B: Teaming up with him is out of the question. He’s a piece of work. If we work together, we’ll just wind up arguing all the time.
A: I need you to smooth things over with Charles. It’s time to bury the hatchet.
B: He rubs me the wrong way. Every time I try to talk to him, he gives me the cold shoulder.
A: When there’s a will, there’s a way.

Answer

To take charge of something (i): to assume control, to take responsibility.
To rally the troops (i): to unite a group of people towards a shared goal. To increase morale of a group.
One’s bread and butter (i): one’s livelihood, source of income or competency.
The elephant in the room (i): a sensitive issue that is obvious to everyone, but avoided or not talked about.
To have a beef with someone (s): to have a problem or a grudge with someone.
To team up with someone (pv): to join forces with someone or with a group, to form a team with.
Something is out of the question (e): something is impossible, or not allowed.
A piece of work (s)(n): a complicated, difficult person to get along with.
To wind up (pv)(s): to end up, to result in, to do something eventually.
To smooth/patch something over with someone (pv): to make problems, difficulties, or disagreements less serious, to make an unfriendly relationship friendlier. Usually, by talking to the other person.
To bury the hatchet (i): To make peace, to end a fight and become friends.
To rub someone the wrong way (i): to annoy or irritate someone, to make someone feel uncomfortable.
To give someone the cold shoulder (i): to purposely ignore someone, or to show no interest in someone.
When there’s a will, there’s a way (p): You can accomplish anything if you work hard or are motivated. ‘Will’ means strong motivation to do something.


PEPSI Discussion Questions

  1. Recently on the news, have you heard about any companies buying out other companies?
  2. Tell me about a time you jumped from the frying pan and into the fire.
  3. Do you know any companies that are run like a tight ship?
  4. Are you skilled at looking at the big picture?
  5. Is there something that you have to cut back on? 
  6. Have you ever been in a rut financially, creatively, at work, or in your personal life?
  7. Have you ever come under fire for something you did or did not do?
  8. Are you someone who sticks to his or her guns, or do you often change your point of view?
  9. Do you like taking charge or do you prefer to stand back and support others?
  10. Which historical leaders were skilled at rallying the troops?
  11. What is your bread and butter? Your core competency?
  12. Have you ever had a beef with one of your co-workers, classmates or close friends? What happened?
  13. Tell me about someone who rubbed you the wrong way.
  14. Imagine you and your friend had a huge argument. Choose the topic with your partner. Role-play how you would smooth things over and bury the hatchet. How would you have this difficult conversation? What steps would you follow? .

PEPSI – Love 2
Heart

Click: Heart.

PEPSI Love 2 (PDF)


1.
A: How was your first date?
B: I think she’s out of my league. I think we’re at different levels. She’s smart, beautiful, and ambitious. I’m just an average guy.
A: Don’t say that. You’re a great guy!
B: Thanks, but I might have come on to her too strong. I made too much eye contact. I think she already put me in the friend zone.

Answer

To be out of one’s league (i): when someone is too good, or has much better characteristics (intelligence, appearance, accomplishments, personality). A league in sports is a specific group that plays for a championship, so someone out of that league is not at that level.
Ambitious (adj): having a strong desire to be successful, powerful, or famous.
To come on to someone (pv)(s): to flirt with someone, to show romantic, even sexual interest. Synonyms: To hit on someone (pv), to make a move on someone (s).
To put someone in the friend zone (s) | to friendzone someone (s)(v) | the friend zone (s)(n): when someone thinks of another person only as a friend and has no romantic feelings for him or her. Women often put their male friends in the friend zone when they are not interested.

2.
A: How did it go?
B: Terrible! She stood me up. We planned to meet at 8:00pm but she didn’t show up. I called her but her phone was off.
A: Maybe, she had some kind of emergency? How long did you wait?
B: One hour…

Answer

To show up (pv) – to appear, to arrive, to turn up.
To stand someone up (pv) – to fail to meet someone you arranged to meet.

3.
A: Guess what? 🙁
B: What? I’m all ears.
A: My husband had an affair with his co-worker. He broke my heart.
B: Oh my gosh! Don’t put up with him anymore. This is his second time. Get rid of him!
A: I’m going to divorce him. I can’t do this anymore.

Answer

Guess what? (e) – short for ‘Guess what happened to me’ or ‘You won’t believe what happened to me’, often you respond with ‘what?’ Can be used both a positive or negative way. 
I’m all ears (e) 
– I’m listening, you have my full attention. 
To have an affair with someone (i) 
– to cheat on your partner.
To break someone’s heart (i) – to make someone feel sad or hopeless, because of a break up or an affair.
Oh my Gosh (e)(s) – used to express surprise or shock. Synonyms: Oh my God, Oh my Goodness, OMG.
To put up with someone/something (pv) – to tolerate an unpleasant person, situation or experience. To suffer through, or allow something/someone unpleasant.
To get rid of someone/something (pv) – To remove, to abolish, to throw away, or to lose something.

4.
A: I miss my ex-boyfriend. I want to get back together.
B: Been there, done that. No offense, but don’t be stupid. It’s over.
A: I was so wasted last night, and I drunk dialed him. I told him that I still love him, but he turned me down.
B: Face it! He doesn’t love you anymore. It’s just unrequited love.

Answer

To get back together with someone (pv) – to make up, to fix or repair a relationship with someone after breaking up with him/her.
Been there, done that (e) – I’ve been there, and I’ve done that. It’s nothing new.
No offense (e)(s) – I don’t want you to feel bad or angry, but… (Follows something negative)
Wasted (s)(adj) – super drunk.
To drunk dial someone (s)(v) – to call someone when drunk, especially to someone you shouldn’t be talking to (ex-girlfriend, ex-boyfriend).
To turn someone down (pv) – to reject someone.
Face it (e) – used to tell someone to accept the truth and face the facts.
Unrequited love: one-side love, when you love someone but they don’t love you back.

5.
A: How’s your relationship with your girlfriend?
B: Don’t ask. It’s a rollercoaster. I feel like we’re drifting apart. We rarely talk anymore.

Answer

Don’t ask (e) – it’s not good, or they don’t want to talk about it.
A rollercoaster (i)(n) – a relationship or situation that is up and down. Sometimes it’s good, and sometimes it’s bad.
To drift apart from someone (pv) – to lose personal contact with someone who you were once close with.
Rarely (adv) – infrequently, not very often.


PEPSI Discussion Questions

  1. Have you ever dated someone who was out of your league? Why did you think he or she was out of your league?
  2. If you were at a bar, and a man or a woman came on to your partner, what would you do?
  3. Have you ever been put in the friendzone? Have you ever friendzoned anyone? How did you feel?
  4. Have you ever been stood up? Have you ever stood anyone up? What happened?
  5. What would you do if your partner had an affair? Have you ever thought about having an open relationship?
  6. Do you have to put up with any of your partner’s or friend’s annoying habits or behavior? Explain.
  7. What is a bad habit or personality trait you want to get rid of?
  8. Have you ever broken up with someone and then gotten back together with them later?
  9. Tell me about a time you were wasted.
  10. Have you ever drunk dialed anyone? What did you say? How did you feel?
  11. How would you turn someone down? What would you say? What if they are a friend?
  12. Have you been in a rollercoaster relationship? What happened?
  13. Do you feel like you’re drifting apart from anyone recently? Explain.

PEPSI – Love
Love

Love is in the air!

PEPSI Love (PDF)


1.
A: Hey, good-looking. I lost my phone number. Can I have yours?
B: I know you’re hitting on me, but I’m married.
A: I don’t mind. I’m new to the city. Could you give me the directions to your apartment?
B: Perve!

Answer

To hit on someone (pv) – to flirt with someone, to show romantic interest.
I don’t mind (e) – a more polite way to say I don’t care or it doesn’t matter.
A perve (s)(n) – short for pervert, someone whose sexual behaviour is abnormal or unacceptable.

2.
A: She has a crush on him. She dreams about him all day and she’s very shy around him.
B: He’s quite a catch. Smart, handsome and kind.
A: I hope she has the courage to ask him out. I heard he has a thing for blonde girls.

Answer

To have a crush on someone (i) – to like and have strong romantic feelings for someone, usually with someone you don’t know very well and for a short time.
A catch (s)(n) – someone who has many great relationship qualities, someone who you think is very attractive (not just appearance), rare and special.
To ask someone out (pv) – to ask someone to go out on a date.
To have a thing for someone/thing (i) – to like or be attracted to something or someone.

3.
A: I can’t believe she’s going out with him. He’s butt-ugly and broke. I would never date him.
B: Never say never. I heard she’s crazy about him, and they’re planning to settle down.
A: Seriously? Impossible!
B: Maybe it’s because beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Answer

To go out with (someone) (pv) – to date or have a romantic relationship with someone.
Butt-ugly (s)(adj) – super ugly.
Broke (s)(adj) – poor.
Never say never (e) – you should never say never because anything is possible in the future.
To settle down (pv) – to live a quiet, steady life by getting a regular job and have a regular routine (especially after getting married).
To be crazy about someone/something (e) – to really love something or someone.
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder (p) – beauty is subjective, it is different for different people. What I think is beautiful may not be beautiful for you.

4.
A: How did your parents meet? Was it love at first sight?
B: It was! They met at a bookstore. My mother asked my dad what he was reading and they fell head over heels with each other immediately. They tied the knot after dating for 3 months. It was very fast but they were really in love.
A: That’s a very romantic story!

Answer

Love at first sight (i) – a strong feeling of love when you first meet someone.
To fall head over heels with (someone) (i) – to fall deeply in love with someone.
To tie the knot (i) – to get married.

5.
A: John dumped her. She broke down in front of me. I had to get her so many tissues. She wouldn’t stop crying. It was really painful.
B: Ah, poor thing. So they broke up?
A: Yes, unfortunately. But don’t worry, there are plenty of fish in the sea. She will meet someone new soon.

Answer

To dump someone (s)(v) – to end a relationship with someone.
To break down (pv) –to lose control of your emotions, experience emotional stress, often crying.
Ah, poor thing (e) – used to express sympathy.
To break up with someone (pv) – to end a relationship with someone.
There are plenty of fish in the sea (p) – there are many other guys and girls in the world.

6.
A: I met a really beautiful woman last night. We really hit it off. We talked about art, culture, and movies all night. I feel like I’m falling in love with her.
B: I’m happy for you. Did you hook up with her?
A: A gentleman doesn’t kiss and tell.

Answer

To hit it off with someone (pv) – to quickly become friends with someone, to have great chemistry with someone after the first meeting or first few meetings.
To hook up with someone (pv)(s)(strong) – to kiss or have a sexual relationship with someone.
To kiss and tell (i) – to discuss private information about someone or something with other people.


PEPSI Discussion Questions

  1. How do people hit on others? What kind of body language do they use? What would you do if someone you’re not attracted to, hits on you?
  2. When you were young, did you have a crush on anyone? A teacher, famous celebrity, idol?
  3. What kind of person would be a catch for you? What kind of qualities would she or he have?
  4. What do you have a thing for (appearance, habits, personality, …)?
  5. Would you date someone who is butt-ugly and broke but has a great personality that you love?
  6. At what age do you want or did you to settle down? How did your life change?
  7. Do you believe in love at first sight? Have you experienced it, with who? What’s your ideal type?
  8. When did you fall head over heels with your current partner?
  9. At what age do you want to or did you tie the knot? How many children do you want or do you have?
  10. In all your past relationships, did you do the dumping or did you get dumped? How do you feel when you break up with someone (be specific)?
  11. Do you think ‘there are plenty of fish in the sea‘ is good advice?
  12. Tell me about someone you hit it off with.
  13. In the US, casual hookups (one night stands) are becoming more and more common. What do you think about this change? Is it common in your country?
  14. Who kisses and tells more, men or women? Why do people kiss and tell?

PEPSI – Travel

Safe Travels

PEPSI Travel (PDF)


1.
A: Are you all set?
B: Yes, I’m ready! Nice car. Thank you for picking me up. I’m looking forward to our trip!
A: No problem. Let’s hit the road!

Answer

Are you all set? (e) – Are you ready? Do you have everything you need?
To pick someone up (pv) – to go somewhere to collect someone.
To look forward to something (pv) – to anticipate something with excitement, to be pleased about something that will happen in the future.
To hit the road (i)(s) – to start a journey, to begin travelling with road vehicle (car, bus, motorcycle), or to leave.

2.
A: When tourists visit new cities they always go to the very popular attractions or landmarks.
B: I think more people should go off the beaten path and explore places that only locals know about. I think that’s the best way to experience the true colors of a city.

Answer

To go off the beaten path (i) – to go to places that are not so frequently visited.
True colors (i)(n) – the reality or real nature of a situation or person.

3.
A: Why is there so much traffic right now?
B: It’s rush hour. People get off work at this hour.
A: I hope I can arrive at the airport before the airplane takes off. I’m worried about the time. But thank you for dropping me off and seeing me off at the airport.
B: No worries. You’re my best friend! I always hate to part ways with you.

Answer

Rush hour (i)(n) – the time of day when there are a lot of traffic jams, mainly because people are coming to or from work.
To get off (from) work (i) to leave one’s workplace at the end of the day.
To take off (pv) – when an airplane leaves the ground and begins to fly.
To see someone off (pv) – to go to the place someone is leaving from to say goodbye. Usually, you go to the train station, airport or bus station to see someone off.
To drop someone off (pv) – to deliver someone to a place and leave him or her there. To give someone a ride to some place.
To part ways (i) – to go in different directions, to say goodbye to one another.

4.
A: The architecture in this city is amazing! Everything is so historic and beautiful. It must have taken them decades to build all of these landmarks.
B: Of course it took them a long time. Rome wasn’t built in a day.
A: That’s right.

Answer

Rome wasn’t built in a day (p)truth: it takes a long time to create something complicated or impressive, it takes a long time to learn a skill.

5.
A: What do you like about living in this city?
B: I love the diversity. It’s a melting pot. I can meet people from all walks of life.
A: How long have you been living here?
B: I’ve been living here for almost a year. Time flies! I still don’t understand a lot of the customs in this country. But when in Rome, do as Romans do.

Answer

A melting pot (i)(n) – a multicultural place.
People from all walks of life (i) – people from different backgrounds (socio-economic level, age groups, ethnicity, nationality personality, job).
Time flies (e) – time goes by really fast, usually because you’re enjoying your time.
When in Rome, do as Romans do (p) – advice: behave like the people around you. If you visit a different place or culture, you should learn their customs and practices.

6.
A: It was so great to see you again. I had a lot of fun catching up with you.
B: I can’t believe I bumped into you here. It’s a small world.
A: What a coincidence! Oh my God, look at the time. I have to take off. I’ll call you soon.
B: Take care and keep in touch!
A: I will. Bye!

Answer

To catch up with someone (pv) – To talk with someone you haven’t seen in a long time, and updating the other person on your life, and learning about their life as well.
To bump into someone (pv) – To accidentally or coincidentally meet someone.
It’s a small world (e) – express surprise when meeting someone coincidentally, especially in a distant place. Or when you have mutual friends or acquaintances with someone. (Disney attraction).
Take care (e) – to keep yourself safe, used when saying goodbye. Synonyms: Goodbye, Have a good one, Take it easy, See you, Catch you later, Peace out (s).
Keep in touch (e) – to maintain communication with someone, usually used when you won’t see the other person soon.


PEPSI Discussion Questions

  1. Did anyone pick you up when you came to this city?
  2. Are you looking forward to anything?
  3. Describe places in your city that are on the beaten path. What about places off the beaten path?
  4. Do you know the song, ‘Hit the Road, Jack’ by Ray Charles? (Find it online and listen to it)
  5. Describe the rush hour in your city. How busy are the roads, the subways, the streets and the buses?
  6. What time do most people get off work in your country? What do you usually do after work or school?
  7. Who normally drops you off or sees you off at the airport when you travel to another country?
  8. What skills would you love to learn? What’s the best way to learn something?
  9. When does time fly for you?
  10. Is your city a melting pot? Which cities in the world are melting pots?
  11. Are there any customs you had to learn when you traveled or move to another country? Did you have culture shock?
  12. Is there anyone you would like to catch up with?
  13. Do you think we live in a big world or a small world?

PEPSI – Learning
Reading

Happy Learning!

PEPSI Learning (PDF)


1.
A: That old guy with grey hair drives a really cheap car. He must be poor.
B: Who, that guy? He’s Warren Buffet, a billionaire! He has a ton of money but he prefers to live frugally. Don’t judge a book by its cover.
A: Seriously?! There’s more than meets the eye. I shouldn’t take everything at face value.

Answer

Don’t judge a book by its cover (p)Warning: You shouldn’t judge something or someone by only looking at the surface. Appearances are superficial, you should look deeper, focus on the inside. You can’t know what’s inside from the outside.
There’s more than meets the eye (i) – something or someone is more complex, more important, more interesting than what you see initially. There’s more than just the surface, or appearance.
To take something at face value (i) – to only look at the surface, to accept something or someone just as it appears.

2.
A: Wow, you speak English very well. How long have you been studying?
B: Oh, I didn’t study. I just picked it up by watching American sitcoms.
A: That’s incredible! I want to learn Spanish but I have been putting it off. I keep procrastinating, and I never start.

Answer

To pick something up (pv) – to learn something without formal instruction.
To put something off (pv) – to postpone/to delay/to procrastinate.

3.
A: Did you study for the exam today?
B: I pulled off an all-nighter. I stayed up all night studying. I’m beat!
A: Me too. I’m dead tired! Do you know everything by heart?
B: Yeah, I think so. I think I memorized all the material.

Answer

To pull something off (pv) – to succeed in achieving something difficult, to make something happen, to accomplish something.
To stay up (pv) – to not sleep, to be awake.
To pull (off) an all-nighter (s)(n) – to not sleep all night for work or your studies, usually to meet a deadline.
I’m beat (e) – I’m tired. Synonym: I’m dead tired. I’m exhausted.
To know something (off) by heart (i) – to know something from memory, to have something memorized perfectly with no gaps in knowledge.

4.
A: Which school of thought do you belong to? Evolution or Creationism?
B: I support Darwin’s idea of Evolution. Humans evolved from apes.
A: We’re not on the same page. I believed God created the world.
B: To each his own.

Answer

A school of thought (i)(n) – a way of thinking, a point of view held by a particular group, or a particular philosophy.
To be on the same page (i) – to have the same information, to think in a similar way or to be in agreement.
To each his own (p) – everyone has his or her own opinion or tastes and we should respect that.

5.
A: What do you do in your free time?
B: I’m a bookworm. I really love reading. I read two books every week.
A: That’s impressive! You must be really smart.
B: People say I’m book smart, but I’m not very good in relationships with other people. I’m an open book and I can’t hide my emotions, so people sometimes misunderstand me.
A: I’m the opposite. I’m street smart. I’m a people person. I enjoy socializing and getting to know other people.

Answer

A bookworm (s)(n) – a person who loves reading.
An open book (n) – 1) someone whose life is visible to everyone, not kept a secret. 2) Someone who can’t hide his or her thoughts/feelings.
Book-smart (s)(adj) – someone who has a lot of academic book knowledge, but often isn’t very good at dealing with people or situations in real life.
Street-smart (s)(adj) – opposite of book-smart, someone who has more real life knowledge, knows how to deal with people and knows what’s going on in the world nowadays.
A people person (s)(n) – a person who enjoys talking to other people, who is friendly and warm to strangers and others.


PEPSI Discussion Questions

  1. Why do we judge a book by only looking at the cover? Have you ever misjudged someone?
  2. Do you often take things at face value? How long does it take to really know someone?
  3. Tell me about a skill you picked up when you were younger.
  4. Have you been putting anything off recently?
  5. Do you stay up late? Do you have any morning or evening routines?
  6. Have you pulled off an all-nighter before? When? Why?
  7. Do you know your own phone number by heart? Whose phone number do you know by heart?
  8. Are you a bookworm? Have you read books recently? What kind of books do you like to read? Do you know anyone else who is a bookworm?
  9. Do you think you’re an open book or a closed book? What are some things you are not comfortable sharing with others or with friends?
  10. Are you more book smart or street smart? Which one is more important to become successful in life?
  11. Are you a people person? Do you know anyone else who is a people person? 
  12. Which school of thought do you belong to? Evolution or Creationism? Pro-abortion or Anti-abortion? Pro death penalty or against the death penalty?

PEPSI – Life
Friendship

Long time no see, old friend.

PEPSI Life (PDF)


1.
A: Who is your favorite Disney princess?
B: Cinderella! She’s kindhearted and beautiful. And she went from rags to riches!

Answer

To go from rags to riches (i) – to go from poor to rich. Rags means old dirty clothing. To use it as an adjective, you can say: a rags-to-riches Famous stories: J.K. Rowling, Andrew Carnegie, Abraham Lincoln, Howard Schultz, Li Ka-shing, Sam Walton, Oprah Winfrey, John D. Rockefeller, Richard Branson, Jim Carrey.

2.
A: Guess what? You won’t believe it.
B: What happened?
A: I was walking back home when out of the blue a really beautiful woman asked me for my number. I gave it to her and she kissed me on the cheek and gave me $100. I was so surprised.
B: No way! Get out of here. Don’t bullshit me.

Answer

Guess what? (e) – to introduce a surprising outcome, to dramatize the introduction of some story. Often the other person responds with what?
Out of the blue (i)(adv) – unexpectedly, suddenly, surprisingly.
Really? (e) – express surprise or shock. Synonym: No way! Are you kidding me? Are you serious? Get out of here.
Bullshit (s)(n)(rude) – nonsense, stupid, unfair, false. It can also be used as a verb to mean deceive, mislead, or lie. Synonym: Bull, BS, Bollocks (UK).
Don’t bullshit me (e)(s)(rude) – Don’t lie to me, I don’t believe you.

3.
A: I was shopping yesterday when all of a sudden I bumped into my old high school friend. I hadn’t seen her in 10 years! She is on vacation right now with her family.
B: Wow! You ran into her? That’s such a coincidence. It’s a small world!
A: I’m going to meet her for lunch tomorrow.
B: Have a great time.

Answer

All of a sudden (i) – suddenly, very quickly and unexpectedly.
To bump into someone | To run into someone (pv) – to meet someone by chance, accidentally or coincidentally.
It’s a small world (e) – express surprise when meeting someone coincidentally, especially in a distant place. Or when you have mutual friends or acquaintances with someone. (Disney attraction)
Have a great time (e) – to wish someone a good time. Synonym: have a good time, have fun, have a blast, have a ball, enjoy yourself.

4.
A: I have something to ask you but I don’t know if I should.
B: Spit it out. I don’t bite.
A: Well…I feel lost. I don’t know what to do with my life. Do you have any advice for me?
B: I can’t decide your future but continue to work hard, and don’t give up. Rome wasn’t built in a day.

Answer

Spit it out (e)(s) – tell me. Use this expression when someone is reluctant or hesitant to say something. Synonym: out with it (e).
I don’t bite (e)(s)(funny) – I won’t hurt you. Use this to tell someone that they don’t need to be afraid of doing something, used to encourage someone to do something.
To give up (pv) – to quit, to resign, to stop trying.
Rome wasn’t built in a day (p) – be patient, you cannot expect to build something great or achieve success or have all the answers in a short time. To learn any skill takes a long time.

5.
A: How do you see yourself in 10 years?
B: I will be having the time of my life. I will be super rich. I’ll work at my dream job. I’ll have a perfect marriage. My life will be awesome!
A: In your dreams!

Answer

To have the time of one’s life (i) to have the best, most exciting time. To enjoy yourself more than ever before.
Awesome (s)(adj) cool, great, super amazing, extremely impressive.
In your dreams (e)(s) – it’s not going to happen, you’re dreaming. It’s impossible. Synonym: You wish.


PEPSI Discussion Questions

  1. Do you have any role models? What do you admire about them?
  2. Do you know anyone who went from rags to riches? Have you watched or read any rags-to-riches movies, tv shows or books?
  3. Tell me about an unexpected or surprising situation that happened to you recently (use out of the blue or all of a sudden). 
  4. In which situations do people often bullshit (job interview, first date, first meeting…)? What kind of things do they bullshit about in those situations?
  5. Have you ever ran into someone you know in a different city or country? Is there anyone that you frequently bump into?
  6. Do you agree that we live in a small world?
  7. If you could choose to master any 3 skills, which skills would you choose? (singing, cooking, dancing, drawing, learning, speaking a language, networking…) 
  8. Tell me about a trip where you had the time of your life.
  9. Tell me about an awesome person, place, restaurant, movie, and book.
  10. How do you see yourself in 10 years?

PEPSI – Movies

Take out the Popcorn!

PEPSI Movies (PDF)
Discussion Questions (PDF)


1.
A: I’m playing the main character in ‘Les Misérables’ on Broadway!
B: That’s awesome! Break a leg! Good luck! I’m sure you will steal the show!
A: Thanks a million! I appreciate it.

Answer

Awesome (s)(adj) – amazing, fantastic.
Break a leg! (e) – good luck!
Thanks a million! (e) | I appreciate it (e) – thanks a lot.
To steal the show (i) – to get all the attention and praise at an event or performance.

Movie Vocabulary

Broadway (n) – refers to Broadway street in the Theatre District, in Manhattan, New York. Most shows on Broadway are musicals, such as The Lion King, or Aladdin. It’s an extremely popular tourist attraction in New York City.

2.
A: I’m sorry I’m late!!! Subway delays as always.
B: Better late than never. But the movie theater today is packed! There are so many people.
A: What movie are we going to watch? It’s up to you.
B: How about ‘Avatar‘? I heard the special effects are mind-blowing! Let’s check it out.

Answer

Better late than never (p)(e) it is better that you are late, than that you never come. Say this after someone says they are late.
Packed (s)(adj) – full of people.
Up to you (e) it’s your decision.
Mindblowing (s)(adj) really amazing or impressive
To blow one’s mind (i) – something that is really impressive, surprising or eye-opening.
To check (someone/something) out (pv)(s) to look at, to see, to watch, to try.
Check it out! (e)(s) /checkitout/ to try, to see, to experience or to examine something.

Movie Vocabulary

A theater (n) – a building where plays, shows are performed or where movies are show. Spelling: Theatre (UK).
Special effects (n) – image or sound created in movies to represent something real or imaginary.

3.
A: Did you watch that movie ‘The Lone Ranger’ starring Johnny Depp?
B: No, I didn’t. I heard it was a flop.
A: Yeah, it was so disappointing. The acting was so terrible. It didn’t live up to my expectations. The story was so cliché, an unoriginal western.

Answer

A flop (s)(n) – a disappointment or a total failure.
To live up to something (pv) – to fulfill, to reach or to satisfy something.

Movie Vocabulary

To star (v) – to play the most important role in a movie, play, or TV show.
Cliché (adj)(French) /’cli-shai/ – unoriginal and predictable.

4.
A: Do you want to watch an episode of ‘Gossip Girls’ together tonight?
B: Thanks, but no thanks. It’s a chick flick. I don’t watch girly shows like that.
A: Suit yourself!

Answer

Thanks, but no thanks (e) – thank you for asking, but I refuse or I’m not interested (a polite way of turning down or refusing something).
A chick flick (s) – a movie/TV shows that appeals mainly to women.
A chick (s)(n) – a girl, a young woman. A flick (s)(n) – motion picture movie.
Girly (s)(adj) – characteristics of a stereotypical girl, young woman. Synonym: feminine, girlish.
Suit yourself (e) – do what you want. Have it your way. (Angry)

5.
A: Have you watched ‘Inception’ directed by Christopher Nolan?
B: No, I haven’t. I heard it’s a big-budget summer blockbuster.
A: The movie was epic! It’s a masterpiece. The ending was a real cliffhanger, very unexpected and suspenseful. I really hope they make a sequel.
B: That’s enough. Don’t spoil the plot for me. I’m going to watch it this weekend.

Answer

Epic (s)(adj)(adv) /’ep-ik/spectacular, impressive, awesome, or powerful.

Movie Vocabulary

A cliffhanger (n) – when reading, watching a movie or TV drama you reach a very suspenseful part, and can’t wait to see what happens next; usually the ending (“To be continued...” or “The End?”).
Suspenseful (adj) – a feeling of nervousness or excitement caused by thinking about what will happen next.
Big-budget (adj) | low-budget (adj) – used to talk about how much money has been spend on producing a movie. Big-budget (a lot of money), low-budget (less money).
A blockbuster (n) – a successful popular movie or book.
A masterpiece (n) – (1) a highly impressive piece of work, or art. (2) an artist’s best work.
A sequel (n) – a film, game, novel, or TV show that continues the story of a previous work. E.g. The Lord of the Rings 2.
A prequel (n) – a story or movie that contains events before a piece of work. E.g. The Hobbit. 
To spoil something (v) | a spoiler (n) – to reveal parts of the story to someone who doesn’t know the story.
A plot (n) – a story, storyline.

6.
Homer Simpson is a couch potato, he doesn’t do anything all day except binge-watch his favorite TV shows.

Answer

A couch potato (i)(n) – a lazy person who spends his/her time watching television or movies. Usually that person doesn’t exercise much.
To bingewatch (v)(s) –watching television for a long time, usually more than 2-3 episodes in one sitting.

Vocabulary

To binge (v)(s) | A binge (n)(s) – when you eat, drink or spend too much money in a short period of time, without controlling yourself. E.g. binge drinking, binge eating, binge spending.


PEPSI Discussion Questions 

  1. Have you read any awesome movies recently?
  2. Describe a place that is usually packed.
  3. Have you seen any mind-blowing movies or TV shows?
  4. Have you ever watched a flop? Any recent movie that didn’t live up to your expectations?
  5. Describe a cliché movie, TV show, or story.
  6. Do you like chick flicks? Have you watched any?
  7. What would you describe as girly?
  8. Which movies do you think are masterpieces? Why?
  9. What’s a big-budget blockbuster coming out this year that you want to watch?
  10. Tell me an epic moment you’ve had.
  11. Do you think that in general, sequels are better than the first movie?
  12. Have you watched any prequels?
  13. What’s a movie or TV show with great cliffhangers?
  14. Are you a couch potato? What do you eat or drink when watching movies?
  15. Have you ever binge-watched any TV shows? Which ones?

PEPSI – Body 1
Vitruvian

Vitruvian Man

PEPSI Body 1 (PDF)


1.
A: I’m fed up with housework. I spend all day cleaning and cooking. I’m so sick and tired of it.
B: So am I! My children never leave me alone. It’s a pain in the ass.

Answer

To be fed up with (someone/something) (pv) to be annoyed, sick, tired, bored or disappointed with something or someone. When you’ve had enough of something or someone, it’s annoying or irritating you and you want it to finish. Synonyms: sick of, tired of, had enough of.
To be a pain in the ass (i)(s)(offensive)something or someone is very annoying, irritating or frustrating. Synonyms: a pain in the neck, a pain in the butt, a pain in the arse (UK).

2.
A: You seem like a smart guy and knowledgeable about web design. I would love to talk to you about starting a website. Can I pick your brain sometime?
B: Yeah sure, anytime. Ask me any questions you have.

Answer

To pick someone’s brain (i)(s) – to get information or learn more about a specific topic by asking an expert or someone who has more knowledge about that subject. The idea is to borrow someone’s brain to get more ideas.

3.
A: I need to get something off my chest.
B: What’s wrong? What’s troubling you?
A: Your friend Jessica, she has a really big mouth. She told your secret to all of her friends. She’s also been badmouthing you behind your back.
B: I can’t believe it. Why would she do that?
A: Dunno. I couldn’t hold it in anymore. I needed to tell you.

Answer

To get something off one’s chest (i) – to tell someone about something that has been bothering or worrying you, and that you’ve wanted to say for some time.
To have a big mouth (s) a person who can’t keep secrets and enjoys spreading gossip.
To badmouth someone (s)(v) – to insult or criticize someone, usually behind his or her back.
To do something behind someone’s back (i) – to do something without letting that person know about it, without their knowledge, secretly.
Dunno (e)(s)(contraction)I don’t know. Synonyms: Beats me, I have no idea/clue, How would I know?, don’t ask me, who knows?
To hold something in (pv) – to keep one’s emotions hidden inside. Synonym: to keep something in.

4.
A: Excuse me. I need to go to the restroom. Could you keep an eye on my stuff?
B: Yeah, no problem.

Answer

To keep an eye on something or someone (i) – to watch something or someone.

5.
A: Your wedding is tomorrow! How are you feeling?
B: I’m getting cold feet. I feel so nervous and I don’t think I want to marry her.
A: Are you serious?
B: Face it. Our relationship has never been great. I won’t be happy with her.

Answer

To get cold feet (i) – to feel nervous and change one’s mind, especially when you planned to do something very important (e.g. marriage, giving a speech).
Are you serious? (e) – a question you ask when you can’t believe what the other person said. Synonyms: Are you being serious? Seriously? Really? No Way! Are you kidding me?
(Let’s) face it (e) – to accept the truth or reality.

6.
A: Do you think it’s better to be single or married?
B: That’s a difficult question. On the one hand, when you’re single you have a lot of freedom and time to do what you want to do. On the other hand, when you’re married you can share your life with someone and support each other.

Answer

On the one hand | On the other hand (i) – used to describe two contrasting ideas, options, or opinions. Use on the one hand to describe one idea, and on the other hand, to describe the opposite idea.


PEPSI Discussion Questions 

  1. Are you fed up with anything or anyone recently?
  2. What or who is a pain in the ass for you?
  3. If you could ask anyone in the world (dead or alive) to pick his or her brain, who would you choose, and why?
  4. Is there anything you want to get off your chest?
  5. Do you know anyone with a big mouth?
  6. Has anyone ever badmouthed you? What did you do?
  7. Has anyone ever spread false rumors or gossip about you behind your back? What did you do?
  8. Do you usually hold your emotions in, or express them?
  9. Have you ever gotten cold feet? Or know someone who got cold feet before doing something really important?
  10. Debate the following topics (use on the one hand, on the other hand to express contrasting ideas):
    • Abortion: legal or illegal?
    • Same sex marriage: legal or illegal?
    • Death penalty: legal or illegal?
    • Animal testing: legal or illegal?

PEPSI – Animals 2

 

Animals

Image: Happy Family

PEPSI Animals 2 (PDF)


1.
A: Do you work better in the morning or at night?
B: I’m an early bird so I have a lot of energy in the morning.
A: Really? I’m the opposite. I’m a night owl.
B: My mother always told me, “An early bird catches the worm.”
A: I think that’s good advice. I sleep too late every day.

Answer

An early bird (i)(n) – a person who wakes up early, likes to work in the morning.
A night owl (i)(n) –a person who sleeps late, prefers to work at night.
An early bird catches the worm (p) – if you wake up and get work early, you will succeed.

2.
A: I hate the corruption that’s happening in the business world.
B: Exactly! Fat cats are earning such high salaries and bonuses. The rich get richer, and the poor get poorer. Everything is driven by greed.
A: Normal folks like us are just stuck in the rat race. Everyday we work hard and compete with others to pay our bills and provide for our families.

Answer

A fat cat (s)(n)(offensive)an important, wealthy, or powerful person.
The rat race (i)(n) – the competitive and stressful world of work and business. The busy lifestyle of going to work every day to earn money and compete with others.
Folk (s)(n) – 1) people in general 2) friendly way to address people. E.g. hi folks! 3)(US) parents.
To provide (something) for someone (pv) – to take care of someone by making money so that the person can buy the things he or she needs. e.g. to provide food and care for children.

3.
A: What’s up, dog?
B: Man, bad news.
A: What happened? It sounds serious.
B: James let the cat out of the bag. He accidentally told Maria about her surprise birthday party tomorrow.
A: Seriously? What a disaster!

Answer

What’s up (e)(s) – informal expression used to greet someone. Synonyms: How are you? How are you doing? What’s going on? What’s new? What up? Sup? What’s good? 
Dog (dawg) = Man (s)(n) – friend, buddy, brother, boy, bro, dude, chief, boss, mate (UK).
To let the cat out of the bag (i) – to tell someone a secret, usually accidentally.

4.
A: Lately, there have been a lot of copycat murders on the news.
B: I heard about that. People copy criminal acts inspired by books, television shows, or news stories.

Answer

A copycat (i)(n) – someone who copies or imitates someone else’s work, style, or behavior.
A copycat crime (n)(psychology) – a criminal act inspired by a previous crime in books, new stories, movies, or TV shows. Criminals behave in a similar way and copy what they see or read somewhere else.

5.
Police: You’re under arrest. I’m working as an undercover cop.
Gangster (Mafia): I had thought I smelled a rat. I can’t believe you ratted me out. I knew something was fishy about you. Are we not friends?
Police: I’m not friends with criminals.
Gangster: You will pay for this.

Answer

You’re under arrest (e) – expression used by the police when they arrest a criminal.
A cop (s)(n) – a police officer.
A rat (s)(n) – a disloyal, untrustworthy person. A spy.
To smell a rat (i) – to believe something is wrong, or someone is dishonest.
To rat someone out (pv) – to betray someone, to give information about someone to an enemy or to stop supporting someone.
Fishy (s)(adj) – causing doubt or suspicion, something/someone is likely to be bad, dishonest.


PEPSI Discussion Questions 

  1. Are you an early bird or a night owl? or both?
  2. Do you agree with the proverb ‘an early bird catches the worm‘?
  3. Do fat cats in your country have a lot of power? Do they control politicians for example? Do you know any fat cats?
  4. Do you feel like you are in the rat race? What should people do if they want to get out of the rat race?
  5. Did or do you have to provide for anyone?
  6. In your country, what do close friends call each other? Do you use words like ‘dog’, ‘man’ or ‘dude’?
  7. Have you ever let a cat out of the bag? Accidentally revealed a big secret to someone who wasn’t supposed to know?
  8. When you were younger, were you a copycat? Does or did anyone copy you all the time (e.g. your brother, sister, friend)?
  9. Have you heard of copycat crimes? Do you know any?
  10. Do you enjoy crime movies? Do you know any great undercover police stories? Who was the rat? Did the others think there was something fishy?

PEPSI – Animals
Animal Farm

Image: Animal Farm (1954 Movie)

PEPSI Animals (PDF)


1.
A: What are you doing this vacation?
B: I’m going to stay home. I’m a homebody and I prefer staycations.
A: What will you do at home?
B: Maybe, read books and write in my journal. I like to be with myself, I’m a lone wolf.
A: You’re also a bookworm! Carpe Diem, man! Let’s hang out.

Answer

A homebody (s)(n) – a person who likes to stay at home.
A staycation (s)(n)
– a vacation spent in one’s home or home city, involving day trips to local attractions (stay + vacation).
A lone wolf (i)(n) – an independent person who prefers to be and do things alone.
A bookworm (i)(n) – a person who loves reading books or studies a lot.
Carpe diem (e) (Latin) /’car-pay ‘dee-um/ – seize the day, live in the present. Another expression is YOLO meaning you only live once.
Man (s)(n) – friend, buddy, brother, bro, dude, chief, boss, mate (UK).
To hang out with someone (pv)(s) – to spend time with someone, usually talking or relaxing.

2.
A: Michael and Jane are dating!
B: I know. A little bird told me. But I can’t tell you who.

Answer

A little bird told me (i)(e) – used when you don’t want to tell the person who gave you the information. To have learned something from a mysterious unknown, secret source.

3.
A: How come people from the same country always stay with each other? They should spend more time with people from other countries.
B: I guess because birds of a feather flock together.

Answer

Birds of a feather flock together (p) – people tend to associate with those whose values, cultures and interests are similar (express the truth).

4.
A: Did you meet the new girl in our class? She’s so strange and odd. While the teacher is talking, she’s usually drawing animals in her notebook. She often looks at me strangely.
B: She’s the black sheep of our class.
A: Speak of the devil! There she is!

Answer

The black sheep (i)(n) – a member of a family or group whose behaviour or character is different or strange.
Speak of the devil (and he shall appear) (e) – when a person appears after you mention his/her name.

5.
A: What color shirt should I wear for the dinner party?
B: I don’t have time for such unimportant things. I have bigger fish to fry. I have a very important meeting coming up.

Answer

To have bigger fish to fry (i) – to have more important, or interesting things to do.
To come up (pv) (multiple meanings) – a situation or event that will happen soon, is approaching or drawing near

6.
A: I heard you’re going skydiving with Jane this weekend.
B: Unfortunately, we had to call it off. She cancelled our plan.
A: Why? What happened?
B: She chickened out. She was scared.

Answer

To call something off (pv) (multiple meanings) – To cancel an event.
To chicken out (pv)(s) – To decide not to do something because you are scared.


PEPSI Discussion Questions 

  1. Are you a homebody?
  2. Do you prefer staycations or vacations in a different city or country?
  3. Do you know anyone who is a lone wolf? Describe him/her.
  4. Are you a bookworm? What kind of books do you read?
  5. In your country, what do close friends call each other? Do you use words like ‘man’, ‘bro’ or ‘dude’?
  6. Why do birds of a feather flock together?
  7. Who is the black sheep in your family? Why?
  8. In your country, do you have a similar expression for ‘speak of the devil‘? 
  9. Do you have any event coming up soon?
  10. Have you ever chickened out? What happened? How did you feel?