Steak and Eggs

PEPSI Food 1 (PDF)


1.
A: I’m so freakin’ hungry!
B: So am I. I haven’t eaten all day! Let’s go grab a bite.
A: Where should we eat?
B: I don’t know. You’re a foodie. You love eating out so you should know a lot of places.
A: How about Shake Burger? Their burgers are really famous.
B: Hell yeah! Let’s go there.

Answer

[pullquote align=”full” cite=”” link=”” color=”#21608D” class=”” size=”14″] Freakin’ (s)(adv/adj) – when used as an adverb, it means very or really. E.g freakin’ wonderful (really wonderful). When used with a noun, to make something negative sound stronger. Euphemism for  fucking (s)(offensive). E.g. Close the door. > Close the freakin’ door. > Close the fucking door! (strong)(rude).
To (go) grab a bite (i)(s) – Informal to mean, “eat something” – usually a quick meal.
A foodie (s)(n) – someone who is really interested in food, usually enjoys finding new restaurant, new foods and understanding how a dish is prepared.
To eat out (pv) – to eat away from home, usually in a restaurant. Opposite: To eat in (pv).
Hell yeah! (e)(s) – express excitement, or agreement. Opposite: Hell no!

[/pullquote]
2.
A: How was the English exam? Was it difficult?
B: Nope. I think it was a piece of cake. You?
A: Yep. It was pretty easy.

Answer

[pullquote align=”full” cite=”” link=”” color=”#21608D” class=”” size=”14″]

Nope (s) – informal way to say, “no.” Opposite: Yep (s).
A piece of cake (i) – something that is easy to do. Synonyms: easy as pie (i)(adj), easy peasy (e)(childish), child’s play (n), a walk in the park (i)(n)(comparison), a cake walk (i). 

[/pullquote]

3.
A: What are you doing after work?
B: Nothing. I was planning to go home.
A: Do you wanna grab a drink?
B: Sounds good.

Answer

[pullquote align=”full” cite=”” link=”” color=”#21608D” class=”” size=”14″]

Wanna (s)(contraction) – informal reduction of ‘want to’. Much more common with the subject you, and I than with he, she, they or we. Don’t use contractions in formal writing or speaking. Other common contractions: gonna (going to), gotta (got to), watcha (what are you), ya (you), lemme (let me), gimme (give me), kinda (kind of) and ain’t (am not).
To (go) grab a drink (i)(s) – to go out and get some alcoholic drinks. Depending on the situation and context, you can use this idiom as an invitation for a date.

[/pullquote]

4.
Waiter: Excuse me. Are you still working on it?
Customer A: No, I’m not. I’ve finished eating. Could I have this to go? And the check, please.
Waiter: Yes, of course.
Customer B: Thank you. Jane, let’s go Dutch?
Customer A: No way! You’re not paying half. It’s my treat. I’ll foot the bill.

Answer

[pullquote align=”full” cite=”” link=”” color=”#21608D” class=”” size=”14″]

Are you still working on it? (e) – used by a waiter or waitress to ask you if you have finished eating. Synonym: Are you still working on that? (e).
Can/could I have this to go? (e) – ask a waiter or waitress to put leftover food in a box or container to take home.
Check, please (e)(US) – ask a waiter or waitress for the check (total amount of the bill). Synonyms: Bill, please (e)(UK).
To go Dutch (e) – (1) to split the cost of something equally, everyone pays an equal share of the total amount. (2) when each person pays for what he or she ordered.
My treat (e) – to pay for something.
To foot the bill (for something) (i) – to pay for something, to pay the costs of something, to treat someone to something.

[/pullquote]

5.
Waitress: Are you all set?
Customer: Not yet. I can’t decide. What would you recommend?
Waitress: The steak and eggs is really popular. Our customers love it.
Customer: That sounds delicious. I’ll have that.
Waitress: How would you like the meat cooked? How would you like your eggs?
Customer: What are the options?
Waitress: Well, for the meat you can have rare, medium rare, medium, medium well and well
done. Eggs can be fried, scrambled, boiled, or poached.

Answer

[pullquote align=”full” cite=”” link=”” color=”#21608D” class=”” size=”14″]

Are you all set? (e) – Are you ready? Are you finished? Another very common expression that is used is You’re all set (e) meaning you’re finished, often used after a payment.
What would you recommend? (e) – to ask for a person’s recommendation.
What are the options? (e) – used when you’re not sure what choices you have, especially, when you don’t know the name of something. For example, when the waiter or waitress asks how you would like your food to be cooked, or the dressing you want, or some question you didn’t fully understand.

[/pullquote]

PEPSI Discussion Questions

  1. Are you a foodie?
  2. Where do you usually go to grab a bite?
  3. How often do you eat out? What kind of food do you enjoy?
  4. What subject in school is/was a piece of cake for you?
  5. What do you do with leftovers? Do you bring it home? Leave it? Give it to someone on the streets?
  6. In your culture, do you often go Dutch?
  7. In your culture, on a first date, does the man foot the bill? Describe the dating culture from your country.
  8. How do you like your steak? What style of eggs do you prefer?